How to Set Up a Greenscreen on a Budget (2023): Stands, Materials, Lighting

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A more heavy-duty option is C-stands. These are expensive ($165) (and I haven’t tried this one yet). If you’re trying to stick to a budget, you might only want one for your heaviest equipment. These have three independent legs that can each rotate up to 120 degrees, which helps stabilize the stand. It’s also sturdy enough to support a telescoping arm on its own. These can be really helpful for supporting heavy lights you need to light your greenscreen without being visible in the camera.

Light Your Greenscreen Properly

There are countless ways to light both your subject and your screen, and there are few wrong answers when choosing the gear you’re going to use. No matter what kind of lights you use, your goals are going to be the same: Light your screen evenly, avoid casting any shadows, and light it separately from the lighting on your subject as much as possible.

This can be a challenge, but more often than not, you’ll at least need a couple of large, bright light sources. Smaller lights, especially when positioned close to the screen, will create hot spots where the parts of the screen near the light are much brighter than the parts further away. To solve this, you have two options: Get some big lights or diffuse smaller ones.

This is where softbox photography lights come in handy. This one from Emart ($72) has served me well for years. It has a few light bulbs inside. The softbox spreads the light more evenly and cuts down on harsh shadows. It’s handy to have for lighting your subject, but also useful to light your greenscreen for a more consistent key.

You can get a more powerful light like this one ($139), which we recommend in our home video gear guide, but you’ll need your own softbox. You might also consider LED panels ($200). These are increasingly popular, as many of them allow you to adjust the color temperature (or even the RGB color) of the light, which can be handy and save you some postproduction work later. Some of them can even be fairly cheap.

In recent months, I’ve been using this pack of Neewer 660 Pro LED panels ($326). They work best with these collapsible softbox diffusers ($49). Best of all, the softboxes come with their own grids. Grids help you direct light in specific directions rather than blast it out everywhere. This can be extremely handy when you want to light your greenscreen and your subject separately.

The software to key out greenscreens is cheaper and easier to use than ever—the free video editor DaVinci Resolve has multiple chroma-key tools built right in—but they’re not miracles. The best way to save yourself time and energy, and make your shots look the best they can be, is to set up and light your greenscreen properly the first time.

Source : https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-build-green-screen/

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Date de Publication : 2022-10-14 09:00:00

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