A new era in accelerating scientific discovery

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Collaboration with PNNL

A scientist sits at a desk and works on a computer A Microsoft scientist works with the Azure Quantum Elements platform.

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A graphic shows from the 32.6 million materials, AI inference predicted an initial 500,000 stable material candidates. Traditional physics-based HPC simulations further winnowed the pool of candidates. The electrolyte was identified after applying a final set of AI property-prediction filters developed with the PNNL team based on expert criteria. From the 32.6 million materials, AI inference predicted an initial 500,000 stable material candidates. Traditional physics-based HPC simulations further winnowed the pool of candidates. The electrolyte was identified after applying a final set of AI property-prediction filters developed with the PNNL team based on expert criteria.

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A press is used to ground down raw material into a pellet Raw material is ground down to the final material and compacted by a press into a pellet. The pellet is combined with an anode (-) and cathode (+), which allow the prototype to be charged and to provide power.

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Man stands with his arms crossed Brian Abrahamson, chief digital officer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (Photo by Andrea Starr for PNNL)

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Scientist mixes raw materials in a lab Pacific Northwest National Laboratory materials scientist Shannon Lee mixes raw materials to synthesize a new solid electrolyte, one of the promising candidates predicted using AI and HPC tools in Microsoft’s Azure Quantum Elements service. (Photo by Dan DeLong)

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A scientist works in a lab Dan Thien Nguyen, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory materials scientist, assembles a coin cell with the synthesized solid electrolyte. (Photo by Dan DeLong)

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Samples of a new solid electrolyte are shown in a clear tube Samples of the new solid electrolyte discovered by Microsoft AI and HPC tools. (Photo by Dan DeLong)

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A scientist tests batteries in a lab Batteries with the new electrolyte are tested to ascertain how they charge and discharge. (Photo by Dan DeLong)

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A scientist works in a lab Pacific Northwest National Laboratory materials scientist Dan Thien Nguyen examines the performance of the new solid electrolyte in full cell configuration under controlled pressure and temperature. (Photo by Dan DeLong)

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A material sciences group lead stands in a lab Vijay Murugesan, material sciences group lead at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, says the Microsoft AI and HPC tools allow scientists to eliminate the time-consuming trial-and-error discovery steps and focus on the best candidates for testing. (Photo by Andrea Starr for PNNL)

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Azure Quantum Elements launch

Illustrative design of Microsoft’s quantum supercomputer Illustrative design of Microsoft’s quantum supercomputer in an Azure Datacenter

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Two people gather around a computer monitor that has colorful molecular shapes displayed BASF chemist Dr. Fangfang Chu (left) and molecular simulation expert Dr. Eduard Schreiner discuss the computer simulation of microcapsules that enclose and protect the active ingredients of products like vitamins. BASF is using Azure Quantum Elements to help increase the speed and efficiency of development. (Credit: BASF SE)

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A view looking up at a quantum cryostat A cryostat in the Azure Quantum development lab

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PowerPoint slide featuring customer logos Some of the industry innovators who have already adopted Azure Quantum Elements

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Two people with gloved hands work on a quantum cryostat Senior cryogenic engineers work in Microsoft’s Azure Quantum development lab.

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A person wearing gloves holds in front of her a monolith A Johnson Matthey engineer inspects a monolith, the catalyst support that is a key component of a catalytic converter. Johnson Matthey scientists are using Azure Quantum Elements to accelerate research into the chemicals that coat a monolith and convert harmful exhaust gases into nontoxic products. (Credit: Johnson Matthey)

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Infographic visualizing Microsoft’s roadmap to a quantum supercomputer We have achieved the first milestone towards a quantum supercomputer

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A person holds a bucket pouring a substance on a monolith A Johnson Matthey employee applies a catalyst coating to a supporting structure – a key component of a catalytic converter. Johnson Matthey scientists are using Azure Quantum Elements to speed up innovation into sustainable technologies. (Credit: Johnson Matthey)

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Infographic visualizing Microsoft’s Quantum Computing Implementation Levels As the industry progresses quantum hardware will fall into one of the three categories of Quantum Computing Implementation Levels

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Videos

Accelerating scientific discovery

Azure Quantum Elements vision

Microsoft’s physics breakthrough

Johnson Matthey and Azure Quantum

Source : https://news.microsoft.com/azure-quantum/

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Date de Publication : 2023-12-15 03:04:09

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